ESP Hardware

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List of supported ESP hardware

This is a (not yet complete) list of Hardware which is known to be supported:

Device Name ESP Chip Flash Size USB-TTL GPIOs available
(red=not recommended use due to possible problems)
GPIO connected to onboard Hardware onboard PSU/voltage regulator Input voltage Antenna Size (LxWxH)
12 E/F 4MB CH340 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, A0 (with Voltage divider) 1&3 (serial) RT9013 5 VDC (+/-0,5V) onboard PCB 34.2mm x 25.6mm x ?mm
12 E/F 16MB CP2104 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, A0 (with Voltage divider) 1&3 (serial) RT9013 5 VDC (+/-0,5V) onboard ceramic/pigtail connector 34.2mm x 25.6mm x ?mm
WeMos D1 R2

Wemos d1 r2.jpg

12 E/F 4MB CP340G 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, A0 (with Voltage divider) 1&3 (serial) 9-24VDC Switching power supply to 5 VDC(@1A) and RT9013 9-24VDC (power jack), 5VDC (5V pin) onboard PCB 68.6mm x 53.4mm x ?mm (=Arduino UNO)
12 E 4MB CP2102 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, A0 (with Voltage divider) 1&3 (serial) AMS1117 5 VDC (+/-0,5V) onboard PCB  ?mm x ?mm x ?mm
12 E 4MB CP340 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, A0 (with Voltage divider) 1&3 (serial) AMS1117 5 VDC (+/-0,5V) onboard PCB  ?mm x ?mm x ?mm
generic ESP8266 1MB - 0, 2 1&3 (serial) Attention! ESP-01 with PUYA flash chip run into troubles with ESPEasy at this time. Problem is under investigation 3.3 VDC onboard PCB 11mm x 10mm x 2mm
generic ESP8266 or ESP8285 1MB None 1, 3, (14) 0 (button), 12 (Relay 10A@230VAC), 13 (LED) on board mains AC to 5DVC + ? 3.3V Voltage Regulator
Attention! The DC power is NOT galvanically decoupled from AC power!
90-250VAC onboard PCB 88mm x 38mm x 23mm
Sonoff TH10/TH16

Sonoff th.jpg

generic ESP8266 or ESP8285 1MB None 1, 3, (14) 0 (button), 12 (Relay 10A/16A@230VAC), 13 (LED), 14 (AM2301) on board mains AC to 5DVC + ? 3.3V Voltage Regulator
Attention! The DC power is NOT galvanically decoupled from AC power!
90-250VAC onboard PCB 88mm x 38mm x 23mm
Sonoff S20

Sonoff S20.jpg

generic ESP8266 or ESP8285 1MB None 1, 3, (14) 0 (button), 12 (Relay 10A@230VAC), 13 (LED) on board mains AC to 5DVC + ? 3.3V Voltage Regulator 90-250VAC onboard PCB  ?
Sonoff 4ch

Sonoff-4ch.jpg

generic ESP8285 1MB None 2, (7, 8) 0, 9, 10, 14 (Buttons), 4 , 5, 12, 15 (Relay 10A@230VAC), 13 (LED blue) on board mains AC to 5DVC buck converter + 3.3V Voltage Regulator 90-250VAC onboard PCB 145mm x 90mm x 41mm
generic ESP8285 1MB None - 0 (button), 12 (Relay 2A@230VAC), 13 (LED blue) on board mains AC to 5DVC buck converter + 3.3V Voltage Regulator 90-250VAC onboard PCB 86mm x 86mm x 37mm (EU)
120mm x 78mm x 41mm (US)
generic ESP8285 1MB None - 0+9 (buttons), 12+5 (Relays), 13 (LED blue) - 250VAC onboard PCB 86mm x 86mm x 37mm (EU)
generic ESP8285 1MB None 0, 9, 10, 14 4 , 5, 12, 15 (Relay 10A@230VAC), 13 (LED red) powered by 7-32V or USB (5V) 90-250VAC onboard ceramic 75mm x 75mm x 18mm
generic ESP8285 1MB None - 12 (Relay 10A@230VAC), 13 (LED red) powered by 5V or USB (5V) 90-250VAC onboard ceramic 30mm x 70mm x 18mm
Ai-Thinker A20 Breakout

Ai-thinker a20.jpg

generic ESP8285 1MB None  ?  ?  ?  ? SMA Connector  ?
ESP8266 IOT Internet Things Development Board generic ESP8266 4MB CP2104 A0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 (D0) needs to be high to pull reset UP. 4&5 (OLED SSD1306 I2C display, needs 'testing' firmware for 128x32 support) powered by USB (5V) or with battery (circuit to control 1-cell LiPo batery charging chip, likely S-8261ABPMD-G3PT2x) 3.3-7VDC onboard PCB 50mm x 18mm x ?mm

Flash modes

To flash a flash chip you need to send the bin file data using serial communication. There's multiple standards on how to do this communication (flash modes). Not all flash chips support all of these modes. The datasheet provided by the manufacturer is the best source to know what supports what. But here's a list of the different modes used:

Mode Extra information
DOUT SPI host uses the "Dual Output Fast Read" command (3Bh). Two SPI pins are used to read flash data out. Slightly slower than DIO, because the address is written via the single MOSI data pin.
DIO SPI host uses the "Dual I/O Fast Read" command (BBh). Two SPI pins are used to write the flash address part of the command, and to read flash data out. Therefore these phases need half the clock cycles compared to standard SPI.
QOUT SPI host uses the "Quad Output Fast Read" command (6Bh). Four SPI pins are used to read the flash data out. Slightly slower than QIO, because the address is written via the single MOSI data pin.
QIO SPI host uses the "Quad I/O Fast Read" command (EBh). Four SPI pins are used to write the flash address part of the command, and to read flash data out. Therefore these phases need a quarter the clock cycles compared to standard SPI.

In terms of performance: QIO > QOUT >> DIO > DOUT. QOUT or QIO are much faster than DIO or DOUT. ESP Easy official builds uses DIO for everything except DOUT for the smaller (1M size) units.

Power for your ESP

Power supplies and USB cables are more important for the reliability of ESP Easy than you might think.

Power Supplies

Do yourself a big favor: avoid cheap power supplies! We have seen some strange behavior from cheap power supplies. If you put a voltmeter on these it shows the correct voltage. Everything looks nice. If you use an oscilloscope you may get some nasty surprises. Oscillating voltage, ripples.....

Use a high quality power supply like MeanWell or similiar. It should have at least a current of 1..2 ampere.

USB Cables

If you are using a nodeMCU, a WeMos or another USB-powered module, be aware of using good quality USB cables. Cheap cables use really thin wires. For transfering data and some milliampere of current these are ok. For an ESP module they possibly are too weak. Voltage drops and some warm boot occurs.

As a rule of thumb: Use USB cables as thick and as short as possible. If you receive warm boots for no obvious reason try a capacitor of at least 470µF from 3.3V to ground as near to the module as possible.

A good power supply is recommended anyways as USB power from the computer is always limited. Do not use the micro USB port for anything but flashing and lab tests. Use Vin instead (on WeMos D1 mini the port is simply labeled "5V").

Checking Voltage

If you need to check voltage the first step is a good quality voltmeter or multimeter. Whereever possible put the probes directly on the ESP-pins of the nodeMCU or WeMos module.

Please be aware that a digital voltmeter is slow. The result you see on the display is always an average value. If you really need to know what's going on with your power supply an oscilloscope is necessary as it can cope with short voltage peaks or drops.